Comments for http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com Sun, 19 Oct 2014 18:00:29 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 Comment on Social Work is Difficult by Amber http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/social-work-is-difficult/#comment-605 Sun, 19 Oct 2014 18:00:29 +0000 http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/?p=285#comment-605 Thank you for your post. I too struggle with the demands of social work, family, school, and time for myself. It seems that more often than not, I am putting myself last which means that self-care is not being done. I feel overworked, overtired, and stretched beyond belief. You give a poignant analogy of the airplane and masks. I have never thought of self-care in that way. However, it makes sense. So often we push ourselves to help others and sacrifice so much of ourselves. Yet if we are not taking care of ourselves first, we will not be able to help anyone else. So self-care must be an ongoing commitment.
Thank you!

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Comment on Social Work is Difficult by Haley http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/social-work-is-difficult/#comment-598 Thu, 16 Oct 2014 02:19:09 +0000 http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/?p=285#comment-598 I completely agree with your thoughts on the difficult nature of Social Work and the vitality of self-care. Anyone in the helping field can attest to the incredible demands these jobs require. It seems there is more to do than there is time to do it, yet the expectations remain. In my previous job as group home administrator and manager, I was doing so much for the clients and staff that I neglected my own care. I developed anxiety complete with somatic problems and let my health and weight get out of control. Because of all that, I ended up not even being that effective in my work since I felt so badly about myself. From that experience, I have not only learned that I HAVE to take care of myself, but that I need to create boundaries. I am human and I have limits. Now, whenever I am asked to do something such as commit to seeing a client until 8pm every week, I say “no”. This has shocked some people, but I always come back with, “If I am not well, I cannot help the clients be well.” No one can really refute that statement 😉
More agencies need to have this discussion and be tolerant of clinicians and helpers in the field who have boundaries and limits that protect them from major health problems and burnout.

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Comment on Helping a Child Heal by Natalie S. http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/helping-a-child-heal/#comment-591 Tue, 14 Oct 2014 03:10:46 +0000 http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/?p=289#comment-591 Dear Helping a Child Heal,
It sounds like you are very compassionate about the services you provide to the children on your caseload. I think it is great to read about the emotional pain you are willing to share with your clients. I myself have only been working with CWS for just over a year now and can relate to your conflicted self. One of the greatest parts of our jobs is either reuniting families or finding that forever home that will give children an opportunity to create a lifetime of connections in a healthy and supportive environment. Remember that children at a young enough age are resilient enough to adjust to the situations that we are putting them in to. They will also become products of their environment. If they are placed into caring, nurturing, most family like homes, the chances are that they will heal and survive. Also knowing that you are probably the most stable figure that these children have probably had for the last two years of their life will assist them as you transition them to their new home. At 3 and 5 if they see you placing them in a new home they will trust that you have found a good match to meet their every need. Do not lose your compassion that you shared about these children, as you are making a difference for the better of many children!

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Comment on Detaining Is Never Fun by Angelina F http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/explore-features-from-the-field/#comment-562 Mon, 29 Sep 2014 00:11:56 +0000 http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/?p=136#comment-562 I have detained many times, but one case stands out to me. I had to detain 3 children out of a home that was raided by the narcotics task force. I was in a similar situation that I wanted to stay and help the mother, but lack the clinical skills as well. This particular mother does not use or sell drugs but her spouse did both. Both parents were arrested. I felt like I wanted to talk to the mom, safety plan with her or something. I understand that she is responsible for the safety and the well-being of her children, but I can’t help but to think how hard it would be to get out of that situation. I agree that the lack of clinical skills in child welfare speaks volumes. I think we would better serve families of this community if we all had those skills.

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Comment on He Verbally Assaulted Me by anonymous http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/welcome/#comment-561 Sun, 28 Sep 2014 16:24:11 +0000 http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/?p=83#comment-561 Our job in Children Services is very emotionally exhausting every day and there have been days that I have come home so emotionally drained that I had nothing left to give my own family. Being able to deal with a person who is escalating while remaining calm is defiantly a skill that is needed in order to be a successful social worker.

Sounds like you were able to understand this man and why he acted the way he did when he was handling a stressful situation and that you were able to provide support and encouragement for him. It also seems to me that you realized that he could easily continue to emotionally exhaust you if you did not get to know why he acted the way he did. Reacting immediately to him while in the escalated state would have done neither one of you any good and in order to provide support for him you had to step away from your own emotions and listen to his rants. You were able to help manage his stress while realizing he was taking all the energy from you emotionally. I hope that from this situation you were able to take some time to yourself and recoup from the emotionally draining job we all do daily in Children Services. Our own self care is just as important as our clients wellbeing, especially if we want to continue to provide encouragement and support to our clients.

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Comment on Betsy Wants Your Advice! by Betsy http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/new-feature/#comment-538 Mon, 01 Sep 2014 15:38:55 +0000 http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/?p=208#comment-538 Thank you for your response. I’ve been talking with the medical director about vicarious trauma as this is a new concept to me and I’m sure our organization. I’m quite concerned about returning to work as I’ve witnessed numerous people either get fired for not having the ability to keep up with the pace and demands of the job. In addition I’ve seen numerous people return from a loa, either physical or mental health, only to be fired. The environment is highly stressful, with many of us consistently fearing losing our job or being written up. I so desire to return to work, However in a different capacity. After much research in regards to regulations, the need for use of evidence best practices and the potential changes coming that will include reimbursement based on outcomes and improvements in consumers, I would like to work in the agency in a mgmt role of practice improvement.

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Comment on Betsy Wants Your Advice! by William Sparks http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/new-feature/#comment-537 Sat, 30 Aug 2014 15:41:44 +0000 http://www.selfcareinsocialwork.com/?p=208#comment-537 Hi Betsy, In my personal opinion you will need an ally in the organization that has power. This could be your supervissor, Exec Dir, Charir of the Board HR Committee, or Board Chair. The strategy is to drive an Trauma Informed Organization Development Model at both the policy and practice level for staff as well as clients. Existing resources include the Sanctuary Model of Sandra Bloom in the US, Becoming Trauma Informed Model from CAMH in Toronto and tips on creating Trauma Informed Agencies from CAST Canada and Francoise Mathieu’s Walk the Walk. Your STS-PTSD counsellor may have a lead on these folks. You will need allies both in and out of the org. Let me know how is goes. Bill in Toronto.

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